Saturday, April 09, 2011

Is Canada a democracy?

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Is Canada a democracy?

Canada is an independent constitutional monarchy, a confederation with parliamentary democracy. So yes it is a democracy.
Canada is a democracy which practices the Parliamentary system of gouvernment and have elected members of parliament (MP).

Canada has political parties and the head of gouvernment is the Prime Minister.
The worst Prime Minister of Canada[1]
The worst Prime Minister in Canada is Stephen Harper.

Wednesday, April 06, 2011

Define: LinkBacks

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LinkBacks

"LinkBack" is the generalized term we use to reference three methods of communication between Websites:



LinkBacks



Why LinkBacks?

LinkBacks (Trackbacks, Pingbacks and Refbacks) allow you to notify another site that you wrote something related to what is written on a specific page. This improves the chances of contributors to this page noticing that you gave them credit for something, or that you improved upon something they wrote. With LinkBacks, websites are interconnected. Think of them as the equivalents of acknowledgments and references at the end of an academic paper, or a chapter in a textbook.

Linkbacks have long been a major force in the development of the blogging network, by creating an interconnected series of blogs and posts acknowledging one another. Not only does this improve the general community ethos throughout the "blog-o-sphere", but it also helps to make blogs into more powerful link-building tools.





Note: Links built via this method are highly relevant and do not carry the disadvantages typically associated with "link farms" or "link exchanges".

Trackback



A Trackback is simply an acknowledgment. This acknowledgment is sent via a network signal (ping) from Site A (originator) to Site B (receptor). The receptor often publishes a link back to the originator indicating its worthiness.

Trackback requires both, Site A and Site B to be Trackback enabled in order to establish this communication. Trackback does not require for Site A to phisically link to Site B.

Pingback

PingbackA Pingback is also a signal (ping) sent from Site A to Site B. However, it's also a link. When Site B receives the notification signal, it automatically goes back to Site A checking for the existance of a live incoming link, if it exists, the Pingback is recorded successfully. This makes Pingbacks less prone to SPAM than Trackbacks.

Both sites must be Pingback enabled in order to establish this communication. If a site is Pingback enabled, each time you link-out you will be "pinging" external sites. Pingback requires for Site A to phisically link to Site B.

Refback

RefbackA Refback is also a link. However in this case, Site A (link originator) does not need to "tell" anything to Site B (receptor). Instead, the receptor Site "discovers" this link immediately after the first web visitor gets to the site by clicking on the link. This is done by analyzing information carried by this web visitor's browser referer header.

This is an easier method than Pingbacks since the Site originating the link doesn't have to be Pingback enabled (Posting a link back within any webpage is good enough).

Monday, April 04, 2011

What is Democracy?

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Democracy is a form of government in which all citizens have an equal say in the decisions that affect their lives. Ideally, this includes equal (and more or less direct) participation in the proposal, development and passage of legislation into law. It can also encompass social, economic and cultural conditions that enable the free and equal practice of political self-determination. The term comes from the Greek: δημοκρατία – (dēmokratía) "rule of the people", which was coined from δῆμος (dêmos) "people" and κράτος (Kratos) "power", in the middle of the 5th-4th century BC to denote the political systems then existing in some Greek city-states, notably Athens following a popular uprising in 508 BC.




According to some theories of democracy, popular sovereignty is the founding principle of such a system. However, the democratic principle has also been expressed as "the freedom to call something into being which did not exist before, which was not given… and which therefore, strictly speaking, could not be known."This type of freedom, which is connected to human "natality," or the capacity to begin anew, sees democracy as "not only a political system… [but] an ideal, an aspiration, really, intimately connected to and dependent upon a picture of what it is to be human—of what it is a human should be to be fully human."
While there is no specific, universally accepted definition of 'democracy', equality and freedom have both been identified as important characteristics of democracy since ancient times. These principles are reflected in all citizens being equal before the law and having equal access to legislative processes. For example, in a representative democracy, every vote has equal weight, no unreasonable restrictions can apply to anyone seeking to become a representative, and the freedom of its citizens is secured by legitimized rights and liberties which are generally protected by a constitution.
There are several varieties of democracy, some of which provide better representation and more freedom for their citizens than others. However, if any democracy is not structured so as to prohibit the government from excluding the people from the legislative process, or any branch of government from altering the separation of powers in its own favor, then a branch of the system can accumulate too much power and destroy the democracy. Representative Democracy, Consensus Democracy, and Deliberative Democracy are all major examples of attempts at a form of government that is both practical and responsive to the needs and desires of citizens.
Many people use the term "democracy" as shorthand for liberal democracy, which may include elements such as political pluralism; equality before the law; the right to petition elected officials for redress of grievances; due process; civil liberties; human rights; and elements of civil society outside the government. In the United States, separation of powers is often cited as a central attribute, but in other countries, such as the United Kingdom, the dominant principle is that of parliamentary sovereignty (though in practice judicial independence is generally maintained). In other cases, "democracy" is used to mean direct democracy. Though the term "democracy" is typically used in the context of a political state, the principles are applicable to private organizations and other groups as well.
Majority rule is often listed as a characteristic of democracy. However, it is also possible for a minority to be oppressed by a "tyranny of the majority" in the absence of governmental or constitutional protections of individual and/or group rights. An essential part of an "ideal" representative democracy is competitive elections that are fair both substantively and procedurally. Furthermore, freedom of political expression, freedom of speech, and freedom of the press are considered to be essential, so that citizens are adequately informed and able to vote according to their own best interests as they see them. It has also been suggested that a basic feature of democracy is the capacity of individuals to participate freely and fully in the life of their society.
Democracy has its formal origins in Ancient Greece, but democratic practices are evident in earlier societies including Mesopotamia, Phoenicia and India.Other cultures since Greece have significantly contributed to the evolution of democracy such as Ancient Rome, Europe,[20] and North and South America. The concept of representative democracy arose largely from ideas and institutions that developed during the European Middle Ages and the Age of Enlightenment and in the American and French Revolutions.Democracy has been called the "last form of government" and has spread considerably across the globe. The right to vote has been expanded in many jurisdictions over time from relatively narrow groups (such as wealthy men of a particular ethnic group), with New Zealand the first nation to grant universal suffrage for all its citizens in 1893.

Sunday, April 03, 2011

New hot trend keywords feeds!

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The new hot keywords feed for trend and SEO!

http://feeds.feedburner.com/hotkeywords
I post this link the feedis following: (Auto change hourly)



Saturday, April 02, 2011

Who is "boo"?

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It is a new trend of someone call "boo"..... But who that is?


Let me Show you!

Friday, April 01, 2011

PHP vs Perl

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Perl vs PHP

PHP is another computer language. In a way, Perl and PHP are competitors in the programming world. Both languages have relatively similar learning curves, work well in the server environment, and have similar overall capabilities.



As you would expect, each language has its pros and cons. Ideally the webmaster would be able to use either language and choose the best one for a given project. However most programmers have a preference for one over the other and will tend to use their favourite.

In recent years PHP has become more popular with new programmers, in particular, web designers learning their first programming language. This may be because PHP is slightly easier to learn from a web design point of view. PHP pages are constructed like HTML pages, with standard HTML markup. PHP code is inserted into the page and executed when the page is requested. Conversely, Perl scripts are run as stand-alone programs and create HTML pages when the script is run.

Another issue is speed and efficiency. PHP is generally considered to be faster than Perl, although this is debatable. In any case there are certainly ways to make Perl perform as fast. PHP supporters often cite speed as a good reason to choose PHP, but in reality it is not normally a concern and any differences are usually academic.
Perl is a very powerful, robust language with more history than PHP. Although the newbie might think that Perl is more complicated than it needs to be for web development, experienced programmers will appreciate the vast array of options available with Perl.

In our opinion....
In regard to web development, we have yet to find a single thing that Perl can't do, whereas we have found limitations in PHP. We feel that the added power of Perl makes it the better choice. We have not found the efficiency issue to be much of an issue at all - in most cases it's only academic and won't actually affect the performance of your website.
In the end, either language will be adequate for most web development requirements.

Thursday, March 31, 2011

Robert Bunsen Profile

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Robert Wilhelm Eberhard Bunsen

 Black-and-white image of two middle-aged men, either one leaning with one elbow on a wooden column in the middle. Both wear long jackets, and the shorter man on the left has a beard.(31 March 1811 – 16 August 1899) was a German chemist. He investigated emission spectra of heated elements, and discovered caesium (in 1860) and rubidium (in 1861) with Gustav Kirchhoff. Bunsen developed several gas-analytical methods, was a pioneer in photochemistry, and did early work in the field of organoarsenic chemistry. With his laboratory assistant, Peter Desaga, he developed the Bunsen burner, an improvement on the laboratory burners then in use. The Bunsen–Kirchhoff Award for spectroscopy is named after Bunsen and Kirchh

[GPC] There's no debate: Elizabeth May belongs in the debates

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The Old Boys’ Club is at it again. Elizabeth May has been denied entry into the televised leaders’ debates.
Instead of speaking up to defend true democracy, other party leaders seem relieved—perhaps due to the glowing reviews Elizabeth received after her first appearance in the 2008 debates.
What kind of democracy excludes a party with the support of one million of its citizens?
What kind of democracy allows a handful of TV executives to decide that a party that only runs candidates in one province has more right to be in a national leaders’ debate than a party with candidates in every riding?

Wednesday, March 30, 2011

Kelly Lin Hsi-Lei Profile

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Kelly Lin Hsi-Lei (林熙蕾) is a Taiwanese actress and model who has appeared mainly in Hong Kong films.

Biography


林熙蕾super sexy寫真
Lin was born in Taiwan in 1975. She moved to Santa Barbara, California with her family at the age of 10. She graduated from the University of California, Irvine with a Degree in Economics. Not knowing what to do after college, Lin decided to pursue a career in show business in Taiwan.

Career

Lin initially wanted to be a singer and has already recorded demo tapes for a record company, but she was given numerous offers for modeling on television and print ads. She was hailed by FHM as "Asia's Sexiest Woman" in 2002, and has graced the cover of numerous fashion magazines in Hong Kong, Taiwan, and China. She has also appeared on copies of Marie Claire - French Edition (2005) and VOGUE Italia (2007).
Lin has been seen in various Hong Kong films and has worked with film directors such as Tsui Hark, Patrick Tam and, most frequently, Johnnie To. Lin has co-starred alongside Asian superstars, including Andy Lau, Stephen Chow and Ekin Cheng. With her success as an actress, she decided to drop her hopes of becoming a singer.