Showing posts with label gpu. Show all posts
Showing posts with label gpu. Show all posts

Tuesday, December 31, 2013

My LG G2 D802 scored 16978 in the 3DMark Ice Storm Unlimited Android benchmark test

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My LG G2 scored 16978 in the 3DMark Ice Storm Unlimited Android benchmark test

LG G2

is Description Benchmark your Android device with 3DMark, the world's most popular performance test. Use 3DMark to test the performance of your smartphone or tablet, then see how it compares with other Android and iOS devices. You can even compare your Android benchmark test scores with tablets running Windows or Windows RT. - The world's most popular benchmark test, now available on Android. - Compatible with more than 1,000 different Android devices. - Compare the fastest Android, iOS, Windows and Windows RT devices. - 100% free. No ads. No restrictions. 3DMark is used by millions of people, hundreds of hardware review sites and many of the world's leading technology companies. It's the industry standard benchmark for graphics performance measurement, a professional level diagnostic tool now available to everyone for free! Use 3DMark Ice Storm for device-to-device comparisons of mainstream mobile devices. Ice Storm is an OpenGL ES 2.0 benchmark test that uses fixed off-screen rendering at 720p then scales the output to fit the native display resolution of your device.

Wednesday, March 02, 2011

Chrome OS news of GPU acceleration!

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GPU acceleration + old drivers = :(


Over the last few months, we’ve made a lot of progress using graphics hardware (commonly referred to as the GPU) to make Chrome faster and more power-efficient. However, as we’ve rolled out features like WebGL and GPU-accelerated HTML5 video, we noticed a troubling trend: users with old graphics drivers experienced a significant increase in crashes when using these features. Because stability is one of Google Chrome’s core principles, we’ve recently become stricter about requiring up-to-date drivers and graphics hardware by adding ranges of old drivers to Google Chrome’s software rendering list.

Developers should continue to ensure that the software-rendered version of their sites work properly for users without GPU-accelerated browsers, so we expect most content to continue to function normally for Google Chrome users with out-of-date drivers -- albeit, without the same performance you might expect from Chrome. WebGL content on out-of-date systems will currently not display, but we are working to provide a software path so that these systems can run basic 3D applications.
As our ability to determine whether a machine can reliably use GPU features improves, we hope to extend hardware acceleration support to more and more users. Here are some steps you can take to maximize the chances that Chrome will run fully hardware-accelerated on your computer:
  1. Use the latest major version of your operating system (such as Windows 7 or Mac OS 10.6)
  2. Install all system updates and driver updates that are available for your system.

Thursday, February 10, 2011

1080i vs 1080p - Similarities and Differences Between 1080i and 1080p

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How 1080i and 1080p Are Both The Same and Different
1080i and 1080p are both High Definition display formats for HDTVs. 1080i and 1080p signals actually contain the same information. Both 1080i and 1080p represent a 1920x1080 pixel resolution (1,920 pixels across the screen by 1,080 pixels down the screen). The difference between 1080i and 1080p is in the way the signal is sent from a source component or displayed on an HDTV screen.

In 1080i each frame of video is sent or displayed in alternative fields. The fields in 1080i are composed of 540 rows of pixels or lines of pixels running from the top to the bottom of the screen, with the odd fields displayed first and the even fields displayed second. Together, both fields create a full frame, made up of all 1,080 pixel rows or lines, every 30th of a second.
In 1080p, each frame of video is sent or displayed progressively. This means that both the odd and even fields (all 1,080 pixel rows or pixel lines) that make up the full frame are displayed together. This results in a smoother looking image, with less motion artifacts and jagged edges.
Differences Within 1080p
1080p can also be displayed (Depending on the video processing used) as a 1080p/60 (Most common), 1080p/30, or in 1080p/24 formats.
1080p/60 is essentially the same frame repeated twice every 30th of a second. (Enhanced video frame rate.)
1080p/30 is the same frame displayed once every 30th of a second. (Standard live or recorded video frame rate.)
1080p/24 is the same frame displayed every 24th of a second (Standard motion picture film frame rate.)
The Key is in the Processing
1080p processing can be done at the source, such as on a Upscaling DVD Player, Blu-ray Disc Player, or HD-DVD player - or it can be done by the HDTV itself.
Depending on the actual video processors used, there may or may not be a difference in having the TV do the final processing (referred to as deinterlacing) step of converting 1080i to 1080p.
For instance, if the TV is utilizing a Faroudja Genesis, DVDO, Silicon Optix HQV, or homegrown processors, such as the ones used in higher-end Sony, Pioneer, Hitachi, and Panasonic sets for example, may be equal to the processors used in many source components - so the results displayed on screen should be equivalent, or very close. Any differences would be more noticable on larger screen sizes.
1080p, Blu-ray Disc and HD-DVD
Also, keep in mind that with both Blu-ray and HD-DVD, the actual information on the disc itself is in the 1080p/24 format. Players, such as LG BH100 Blu-ray/HD-DVD combo player (no longer in production), have the ability to output 1080p/24 direct from the disc to its output.
However, since not all HDTVs can display 1080p/24, when you connect the LG BH100 to an HDTV that does not have 1080p/24 input and display capability but only has 1080p/60/30 or 1080i input capability, the LG BH100 automatically sends its 1080p/24 signal from the disc to its own video processor which then outputs a 1080i/60 signal. This leaves the HDTV to do the final step of deinterlacing and displaying the incoming 1080i signal in 1080p.

Another example of 1080p processing, is the Samsung BD-P1000 Blu-ray Disc Player (no longer in production) - what it does is even more complicated. This Blu-ray player reads the 1080p/24 signal off the disc, then it actually reinterlaces the signal to 1080i, and then deinterlaces its own internally made 1080i signal in order to create a 1080p/60 signal for output to a 1080p input capable television. However, if it detects that the HDTV cannot input a 1080p signal, the Samsung BD-P1000 just takes its own internally created 1080i signal and passes that signal through to the HDTV, letting the HDTV do the final deinterlacing step.
Just as with the previous LG BH100 example. The final 1080p display format depends what deinterlacing processor is used by the HDTV for the final step. In fact, in the Samsung case, it may that a specific HDTV has better 1080i-to-1080p deinterlacer than Samsung has, it which case you may see a better result using the deinterlacer built into the HDTV.
1080p/60 and PC Sources
It is also important to note that when you connect a PC to an HDTV via DVI or HDMI, the graphic display signal of the PC may indeed be sending out 60 discreet frames every second (depending on source material), instead of repeating the same frame twice, as with film or video based material from DVD or Blu-ray Disc. In this case, no additional processing is required to "create" a 1080p/60 frame rate via conversion.
Final Take
In the final analysis, the proof is in the actual viewing - how the image looks to you in the real world with your specific HDTV. Short of having a tech come out and doing actual measurements, or comparing results using different TVs and source components yourself, even if you don't have a 1080p input capable Television, as long your HDTV has 1080p internal processing, you may still be able to get the benefits of 1080p. The key is in the processing, and, of course, not all HDTVs and video processors are created equal - let your eyes be your guide.

Thursday, December 30, 2010

The latest in hardware and gaming

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AMD Radeon HD 6950 Can be Unlocked to HD 6970
Looks like Santa brought an extra present for us hardware enthusiasts this year. Thanks to a less secure locking method AMD's new Radeon HD 6950 can be unlocked to a full blown HD 6970 with a few mouse clicks. As detailed in our article, you can safely perform the flashing process from within Windows. In case something goes wrong it is easier than ever to recover the card thanks to AMD's new Dual-BIOS feature. We tested the unlock on three HD 6950 cards: one AMD engineering sample, one HIS media sample and one ASUS retail card. All of them unlocked perfectly and run at HD 6970 speeds now. More success reports are compiled into a table at the end of the modding article.

Sunday, July 25, 2010

What is CUDA?

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CUDA (an acronym for Compute Unified Device Architecture) is a parallel computing architecture developed by NVIDIA. CUDA lets programmers utilize a dedicated driver written using C language subroutines to offload data processing to the graphics processing hardware found on Nvidia's latemodel GeForce graphics hardware. The software lets programmers use the cards to process data other than just graphics, without having to learn OpenGL or how to talk with the card specifically. Since CUDA tools first emerged in late 2006, Nvidia's seen them used in everything from consumer software to industrial products, and the applications are limitless.