Showing posts with label Web. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Web. Show all posts

Tuesday, October 01, 2013

Google Web Designer beta now available to download. Building beautiful HTML5 creative with ease.

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By now, it’s evident that multi-screen consumption is the way of the future; mobile and tablet devices are becoming consumers’ first screens, so the content that is developed needs to work seamlessly across these screens. There are already more end-users in HTML5-compatible environments than there are in Flash-compatible environments, and HTML5 ad spend is expected to overtake Flash spend within the next two years (1). But until recently, advertisers and publishers didn't have the tools they needed to easily develop content fit for today's cross-screen experiences.


Build once, run anywhere 
We’re working hard to solve this development challenge by offering powerful yet easy-to-use tools for HTML5 production. In this vein, we announced DoubleClick Studio Layouts for HTML5 back in August (also available to DFP Premium publishers using DoubleClick Studio), which lets you create HTML5 ads in minutes, and last week we announced Ready Creatives in AdWords, which creates HTML5 ads for you in seconds.


Today, we’re excited to announce the public beta of Google Web Designer, a new professional-quality design tool that makes HTML5 creative accessible to everyone from the designer to the dabbler.

Google Web Designer enables you to:

  1. Create animated HTML5 creative, with a robust, yet intuitive set of design tools. 
  2. View and edit the code behind your designs and see your edits reflected back on the stage automatically. 
  3. Build ad creatives seamlessly for DoubleClick and AdMob, or publish them to any generic environment you choose. 
  4. Receive updates to the product automatically, without having to re-download the application.
  5. Access all of this entirely for free.


Watch the Demo: A quick glimpse of Google Web Designer

Ready to give it a spin? 
  • Download Google Web Designer. 
  • Read through our getting started guide
  • Send us feedback! We need your input to make this tool even better, so share your ideas with us in our user forum or on our Google+ page. We’re working hard over the next couple quarters to add new features and improvements to make the product an even more robust offering. 
HTML5 is a universal language for building beautiful, engaging content that can run across desktops, smartphones, and tablets. We think that Google Web Designer will be the key to making HTML5 accessible to people throughout the industry, getting us closer to the goal of “build once, run anywhere.”

Monday, September 06, 2010

7 spending tips from frugal billionaires

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by Jean Folger, Investopedia

Carlos Slim Helu (Carlos Slim), a telecom tycoon and billionaire with well-known frugal tendencies, has a net worth of U.S.$60.6 billion according to Forbes. Assuming no changes in his net worth, he could spend $1,150 a minute for the next 100 years before he ran out of money. To put this in perspective, he could spend in 13 minutes what a minimum-wage earner brings home after an entire year of the daily grind.

Granted, the world's billionaires (all 1,011 of them) are in the debatably enviable position of having, quite literally, more money than they can possibly spend, yet some are still living well below their means, and save money in surprising places. Even non-billionaires (currently 6,864,605,142 of us) can partake in these seven spending tips from frugal billionaires.


Keep your home simple

Billionaires can afford to live in the most exclusive mansions imaginable - and many do, including Bill Gates' sprawling 66,000-square-foot, $147.5 million mansion in Medina, Wash. - yet frugal billionaires like Warren Buffet choose to keep it simple. Buffet still lives in the five-bedroom house in Omaha that he purchased in 1957 for $31,500. Likewise, Carlos Slim has lived in the same house for more than 40 years.

Use self-powered or public transportation

Thrifty billionaires including John Caudwell, David Cheriton and Chuck Feeney prefer to walk, bike or use public transportation when getting around town. Certainly these wealthy individuals could afford to take a helicopter to their lunch meetings, or ride in chauffeur-driven Bentleys, but they choose to get a little exercise and take advantage of public transportation instead. Good for the bank account and great for the environment.

Buy your clothes off the rack

While some people, regardless of their net value, place a huge emphasis on wearing designer clothes and shoes, some frugal billionaires decide it's simply not worth the effort, or expense. You can find David Cheriton, the Stanford professor who matched Google founders Sergey Brin and Larry Page to the venture capitalists at Kleiner, Perkins, Caufield & Byers (resulting in a large reward of Google stock), wearing jeans and a t-shirt.
Ingvar Kamprad, the founder of the furniture company Ikea, avoids wearing suits, and John Caudwell, mobile phone mogul, buys his clothes off the rack instead of spending his wealth on designer clothes.

Keep your scissors sharp

The average haircut costs about $45, but people can and do spend up to $800 per cut and style. Multiply that by 8.6 (to account for a cut every six weeks) and it adds up to $7,200 per year, not including tips. These billionaires can certainly afford the most stylish haircuts, buy many cannot be bothered by the time it takes or the high price tag for the posh salons. Billionaires like John Caudwell and David Cheriton opt for cutting their own hair at home.

Drive a regular car

While billionaires like Larry Ellison (co-founder and CEO of Oracle Corporation) enjoy spending millions on cars, boats and planes, others remain low key with their vehicles of choice. Jim Walton (of the Wal-Mart clan) drives a 15-year-old pickup truck. Azim Premji, an Indian business tycoon, reportedly drives a Toyota Corolla. And Ingvar Kamprad of Ikea drives a 10-year-old Volvo. The idea is to buy a dependable car, and drive it into the ground. No need for a different car each day of the week for these frugal billionaires.

Skip luxury items


It may surprise some of us, but the world's wealthiest person, Carlos Slim (the one who could spend more than a thousand dollars a minute and not run out of money for one hundred years) does not own a yacht or a plane.
Many other billionaires have chosen to skip these luxury items. Warren Buffet also avoids these lavish material items, stating "Most toys are just a pain in the neck."

What we can learn

Some of the world's billionaires have frugal tendencies. Perhaps this thrifty nature even helped them make some of their money. Regardless, they have chosen to avoid some unnecessary spending (at least on their scale) and the 6,864,605,142 non-billionaires out there can follow suit, eliminating excessive, keep-up-with-the-Jones style spending.  No matter what a person's income bracket is, most can usually find a way to cut back on frivolous spending, just like a few frugal billionaires.

Wednesday, September 01, 2010

jQuery Flash Plugin

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A jQuery plugin for embedding Flash movies.

Related Topics:

Download


  1. Features


    1. Simple, but powerful.

      Specify what you need, and nothing more -- sensible defaults take care of the rest.

      $('#hello').flash({
          src: 'hello.swf',
          width: 320,
          height: 240
      });
      Perform sophisticated replacements by passing a custom callback.

      $('.custom').flash(null, null, function(htmlOptions){
          // do stuff
      });
      Overwrite the defaults to always to meet your needs.

      $.fn.flash.replace = function(htmlOptions) {
          // always do stuff
      };

    2. Flash Detection, Express Install and more.

      Detect specific major, minor and revision versions of the Flash plugin.

      $('#hello').flash(
          { src: 'hello.swf' }, 
          { version: '6.0.65' }
      );
      Use Express Install, or show an update message if Flash isn't installed.

      $('#hello').flash(
          { src: 'hello.swf' }, 
          { expressInstall: true }
      );
      Or, degrade silently and gracefully.

      $('#hello').flash(
          { src: 'hello.swf' }, 
          { update: false }
      );
      Bypass Flash detection, just in case.

      <a href="page.html?hasFlash=true">I have Flash!</a>

    3. Accessible and Unobtrusive.

      Pages are progressively enhanced when Flash and Javascript are available, and fallback to plain (X)HTML when they're not — like search-engines, pdas or mobile phones. Replacements can happen as soon as the dom is ready. (X)HTML, CSS and Javascript stay where they belong — away from one another — making it easy to remove, update or swap out down the road.

      $(document).ready(function(){
          $('#hello').flash({
              src: 'hello.swf'
          });
      });

    4. Native and light-weight.

      Inspired by tools like SWFObject, UFO and sIFR, but written line-by-line for jQuery — no other scripts required. Less redundancy (jQuery and sIFR both find elements by css selectors and do browser detection, sIFR and SWFObject both do Flash detection) means smaller filesize and faster loading.

  2. Examples


  3. FAQ

    Which browsers are supported?
    Internet Explorer 5.5/6.0/7.0
    FireFox 1.5/2.0
    Safari 2.0
    Opera 9.0
    Why isn't ActiveX control activation in Internet Explorer working?
    The packed version of jQuery breaks ActiveX control activation, see: known issues.

  4. Known Issues

    Problem:
    Using the packed version of jQuery breaks ActiveX control activation in Internet Explorer. To avoid manual activation, Flash movies (and other ActiveX controls) must be inserted by an external script. The packed version of jQuery is a string, which the browser unpacks using eval(). Internet Explorer doesn't think the jQuery object (unpacked in the eval) is “external”, which breaks the workaround. If anyone knows of a /packer/-compatible solution, I'm all ears! See: jQuery/Packer/ActiveX Bug for more info.
    Workaround:
    Use JSMin to minify jQuery. Apply a simple patch to the uncompressed version of jQuery and then pack it. Use the minified version of jQuery instead of the packed version.
    Problem:
    When using the imagebox plugin on the same page as a swf embeded with jQuery.flash, the swf disappears when the imagebox opens, and doesn't reappear when the imagebox is closed. I haven't had time to test it myself.
    Workaround:
    None
    Problem:
    Embed tag attributes are converted to lower case, which seems to be a problem with jQuery's DOM insertion methods (i.e. .html(), .prepend(), etc.)
    Workaround:
    Write a custom replace method that uses innerHTML instead of .prepend()

  5. Version History

Friday, July 23, 2010

SeaMonkey 2.0.6

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Main Downloads

SeaMonkey 2.0.6

Windows, English (British) (10 MB)

 


Thursday, July 22, 2010

Firefox 3.6.7 is released!

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Meet the world’s best browser,
made just the way you like it.